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Tuesday, October 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of Computer simulation of finite amplitude standing waves in rigid-walled ducts found in the catalog.

Computer simulation of finite amplitude standing waves in rigid-walled ducts

by Richard Mark Kadlick

  • 334 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Physics

  • ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25128796M

    finite amplitude. The reflected waves computed by means of the new procedure are in good agreement with experimental data observed in a shock tube for a variety of flow conditions. The pressure variations in a reflected wave lag behind those derived in the conventional manner by the time in which a sound wave travels about one or two duct.   In this paper, the numerical simulation technique based on the finite element method is applied to study the propagation of the plane acoustic waves inside a standing wave tube by means of the application of a harmonic analysis, studying the distribution of pressures in .

    Chapters 2 and 3 together present the characteristics and analysis of changes in the characteristics as a wave propagates from deep water into the point of breaking and runup on a slope. This is done only for the two-dimensional (x, z) plane as waves propagate along a nearshore profile. For a complete analysis of wave propagation to the shore. Nonlinear acoustics Computer program Finite amplitude wave Propagation Nonlinear wave Burgers'equation AB TRACT (Continue on reverse old& If necesary and Identify by block number) A numerical solution to the generalized Burgers' radial wave equation has been developed; it allows oeii to calculate stepwise the harmonic content of a finite.

    "Finite Element Modeling of Micro-Particle Separation Using Ultrasonic Standing Waves." Proceedings of the ASME 12th International Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels, and Minichannels collocated with the ASME 4th Joint US-European Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting. Analysis of vibration band gaps in an Euler–Bernoulli beam with Published by javob on Thickness-twist waves in the nanoplates with flexoelectricity.


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Computer simulation of finite amplitude standing waves in rigid-walled ducts by Richard Mark Kadlick Download PDF EPUB FB2

Adshelp[at] The ADS is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX16AC86AAuthor: Richard Mark Kadlick. Computer simulation of finite amplitude standing waves in rigid-walled ducts. By Richard Mark Kadlick.

Get PDF (2 MB) Abstract. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimitedThe Coppens-Sanders theory for the one-dimensional, nonlinear, acoustic wave equation with dissipative term describing the viscous and thermal energy losses Author: Richard Mark Kadlick.

Manipulation of an infinite set of coupled nonlinear differential equations representing a one‐dimensional model of finite‐amplitude acoustic processes occurring in a rigid‐walled duct (wherein boundary‐layer effects at the duct walls are the dominant loss mechanism) yields a form amenable to a Runge‐Kutta iteration method performed on a : Alan B.

Coppens. This paper presents three different solutions to a one‐dimensional model of the propagation of finite‐amplitude traveling waves in rigid‐walled ducts. The first two solutions, in the nature of pert Cited by: 2" " 14" Abstract 15" Finite amplitude standing waves in acoustic resonators are simulated.

The fluid is initially at rest 16" and excited by a harmonic motion of the entire resonator. The unsteady compressible Navier" Stokes equations and the state equation for an ideal gas are employed. This study extends the 18" traditional pressure based finite volume SIMPLEC scheme for solving the.

The finite volume method described in Section 3 is applied to predict the standing waves in both closed resonators and opened resonators.

The studied shapes of resonators include cylinder, cone and exponential horn. The geometries of these resonators are shown in Fig. order to compare with the results obtained by previous methods, the resonators are filled with R refrigerant and air. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimitedFinite-amplitude standing waves in air at ambient temperature contained in a rigid-walled rectangular cavity were experimentally investigated.

The pressure waveform in the cavity was analyzed for harmonic content and compared to the theory of Coppens and Sanders as modified to include. Numerical simulation of finite amplitude standing waves in acoustic resonators using finite volume method Article in Wave Motion 50(2)– March with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

A finite element algorithm for the study of nonlinear standing waves Article (PDF Available) in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (5) May with Reads. In this paper, we study the phenomenon of separation of traveling and standing waves in a one-dimensional rigid-walled circular duct.

The underlying mechanism for separation, mode complexity, is linear and introduced here by a damped side branch representing an impedance discontinuity. A perturbation expansion is formulated for the one‐dimensional, nonlinear, acoustic‐wave equation with dissipative term describing the viscous and thermal energy losses encountered in a rigid‐walled, closed tube with large length‐to‐diameter ratio.

The resulting set of iterative, linear equations is solved for a finite‐amplitude standing wave. Fig. 2 shows the standing wave velocity and pressure node obtained by linear theory for the oscillations of air column in closed area contraction exponential ducts for area contraction ratio of 1, 16, 49, 64 and According to linear acoustics theory, the velocity and pressure amplitude is infinite at resonant state.

Therefore, the velocity and pressure amplitudes are estimated near the. Approved for public release, distribution is -amplitude standing wave effects in air at ambient conditions contained in rigid-walled cylindrical tubes with large length to diameter ratios were experimentally investigated.

These results were compared to a perturbation solution of the one-dimensional non-linear acoustic wave. Finite amplitude standing waves in metallic rods a) C. Campos-Pozuelo and J. Gallego-Ju•rez Instituto de Act•stica, Serrano,Madrid, Spain (Received 4 March ; accepted for publication 5 September ) Large-amplitude extensional standing waves in metals are studied theoretically and experimentally.

Finite amplitude waves in two-dimensional lined ducts Article (PDF Available) in Journal of Sound and Vibration 37(1) December with 9 Reads How we measure 'reads'. FINITE AMPLITUDE WAVES IN LINED DUCTS 29 p ~+v.V =-Vp+-~eV.~, (3) where S is the dimensionless stress tensor and Re = d* e*[v* with v* the kinematic viscosity of the gas.

In what follows, the motion of the gas in the duct and cavities is assumed to be irrotational and inviscid so that it can be represented by the potential functions ~b(x,y, t.

The finite amplitude standing wave in closed ducts with area contraction was numerically studied. The effect of area contraction ratio and the gas properties on nonlinear standing wave was. Using a novel approach based on Floquet theory, this study analyzes the stability of finite‐amplitude beams over a wide range of parameters.

If beam amplitude is small, PSI is indeed the principal mode under the condition f / σ ≤where f is the Coriolis parameter and σ is the beam frequency, and the growth rate is maximum when. JOURNAL OF COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS 6, () A Computer Study of Finite-Amplitude Water Waves ROBERT K.-C.

CHAN AND ROBERT L. STREET Department of Civil Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California Received October 7, The nonlinear properties of finite-amplitude water waves are modelled by a numerical method based on the. M. Kawahashiand M. Arakawa, “ Nonlinear phenomena induced by finite-amplitude oscillation of air column in closed duct,” JSME Int.

39, – (). Google Scholar Crossref; A. Gopinathand A. Mills, “ Convective heat transfer due to acoustic streaming across the ends of a Kundt tube,” J.

Heat Transfer47– 53 (). The use of FEA to extend the capability of guided wave inspection is described in a number of Industrial Member Reports, including: / ('Finite element analysis of long-range ultrasonic waves in metallic structures of arbitrary cross section') / ('Improvements in guided wave focusing technology for detection of defects in pipelines').Finite‐Amplitude Waves in Solids.

Mack A. Breazeale. National Center for Physical Acoustics, University of Mississippi, University, MSUSA University, MSUSA. Search for more papers by this author. Book Editor(s): Malcolm J. Crocker. Editor‐in‐Chief. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL.Finite differences are applied in the space and time domains, and lead to an implicit scheme.

The numerical model solves the problem in terms of displacement vector field. The pressure field is then obtained from the displacement values. The algorithm allows us to analyze the evolution of the behavior of complex standing waves.